Volume 91, Issue 72

Thursday, February 5, 1998

Smarties


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
 

Droppin' the hard rock Bomb!



By Jamie Lynn
Gazette Staff

What ever happened to loud and heavy rock music? What was once an unstoppable musical force has turned into a rare and seldom-heard underground style. While London's loud rockers, Bomb 32, are the first to notice this trend, it doesn't seem to affect them. In just a few short years of existence, Bomb 32 has become one of this city's most popular live acts and are showing no signs of slowing down. Many think this is because the band represents a true heavy music alternative.

"The problem is that when heavy bands do come to [London], it's a reflection of the whole retro movement," explains rhythm guitarist John Cohen, in reference to the band's place in the local scene. "The last two bands to come to town were Dee Snider and Testament. We don't fit in with those guys."

As a result, the last year has been a busy one for the band. After releasing a single entitled "Swing Harder," Bomb 32 has spent the bulk of the year playing live show after live show, including a special gig at Toronto's famous El Mocambo Club. Lead guitarist Joel Krass says the results have been very favourable.

"Over the last year, we just continued to develop. I mean, we've added new tunes and the face of the band has changed a bit. It's a similar sound but it continues to move in the direction that we move in. Our live shows were never poor, but they've become better. They have more energy and less accidents than before. Not that people don't get hurt, but things are definitely coming along."

So, as the live show keeps evolving, so does the music. While many of Bomb 32's changes are subtle, Krass still claims they are not made consciously.

"It's funny because [the changes] all happen so naturally that they just occur. When we look at a song that we wrote three or four years ago and we compare it to something we've written recently, we see things in the song that have to change, because our interests have changed.

"When we started, we had a sound that was very thin-spread. Now it's become a lot more concrete and a lot more characteristic of us. We're experimenting more within our music and in the beginning it was just trying to find a sound."

However, just as Londoners are starting to become attached to their local treasures, the band opted for their most significant change yet. In April, Bomb 32 will be packing up and moving to Toronto. While the band has loved their time in London, they are now looking for further challenges.

"We're doing it for a change of scenery," claims Crass. "Plus there are more venues, more audiences and more industry [in Toronto]. We're going to be starting from scratch, but we're looking forward to it. The streets aren't paved with gold. I mean, the opportunities to fail are much larger in Toronto, but at the same time the results can be far greater."

Bomb 32 plays Call the Office tonight.




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Copyright The Gazette 1998