Volume 92, Issue 24

Friday, October 16, 1998

arresting developments


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
 

It's a dog eat dog dog world


Gazette file photo

EVERYBODY'S GOT THE CRAZY UNCLE THAT PUTS ON THE HOOD. Dog Eat Dogma brings their own unique brand of punk to Call the Office this Friday.

By Julian Zadorozny
Gazette Writer

A concoction of music that contains speed and a variety of power grooves is what British Columbia has infected onto the rest of Canada. The band responsible is the hungry punk funk trio, Dog Eat Dogma.

"Not much has changed, but we're more determined than ever," says lead singer Bob Dog, in reference to whether the band's ideals have changed since its 1994 release I, Dogeater. Social concerns are what make this band's lyrics so powerful.

Take a mix of humour with the dark imagery of the studio albums and Dog Eat Dogma's music becomes the soundtrack to its poetry. The band has stuck with the same type of "in your face" attitude since its beginning.

"We always try harder and hopefully we're getting better as time goes on," says Dog, while discussing the band's musical creativity over the last few years. "If you take the time and effort to write a song, record it and release it, then you might as well do it on something that's important." Writing songs ranging from greed to gun control is representative of the power which this ensemble is creating in its studio albums and live shows.

The political upswings and the chaos that surrounds the band drives it forward with ambivalent ideals of the world. The band take its non-chalant attitude from preparation to execution. When on stage and in the studio, Dog discusses how he wants to "survive" in Europe and beyond by remaining truthful towards the band and its audiences.

"With the stage show you basically work with whatever parameter you're given and you give it the best you got," Dog explains. "Sometimes you're working against some pretty large obstacles in order to get your show across. We deliver as much impact possible in the short time available."

The personal touch this band delivers is all over the new Dogzilla album. "You have to turn yourself inside out and you let people see an inner part of yourself. The part you normally don't show comes out."


To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department: gazette.entertainment@julian.uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 1998