Volume 92, Issue 70

Tuesday, February 2, 1999


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

In Dyer need of a change

Hemp album hangs itself

Show stopping revue at McManus

Hemp album hangs itself







VARIOUS ARTISTS
Hempilation 2
Capricorn

This National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws benefit album is the follow-up to 1995's popular Hempilation and promises to be a trippy treat for red-eyed weed freaks everywhere. Unfortunately this boring and aimless compilation album leaves a worse taste than a mouthful of stale bong water.

As can be expected, there are a few dull remakes of cliched pot-rock classics. Robert Bradley's Blackwater Surprise covers "Don't Bogart Me" and Spearhead contributes a decent version of Steve Miller's "The Joker" but why would anyone cover the most overplayed song in classic rock history?

Big Sugar covers Paul McCartney's "Let Me Roll It." It may seem strange for those middle-aged Boss-wearing pseudo-rockers to be appearing on a marijuana benefit album, however they recently signed with Capricorn records, so it must be a free promo for the band. Clever.

The first track, "Free to Choose" by Everything, sounds like Kenny G jamming along with elevator muzak. Jimmy's Chicken Shack contributes "High," the deranged screaming of a paranoid drug addict against a background of stock electronica music. And as for Gov't Mule's "30 Days in the Hole," throw these greasy Soundgarden imitators back into the hole from whence they came! Gov't Mule are also signed to Capricorn. Which explains a lot.

All in all, there are three decent tunes on the album. Willie Nelson's "Me and Paul" is a gritty tale of Willie's raucous youth, while Dar Williams' "Play the Greed" is a pretty song about the politics of hemp. Mike Watt's "Sidemousin' the Bong" sounds like a psychotic mutation of a Dylan tune.

Hempilation 2 will not expand your mind. In fact it will probably make you dumber than the weed already has.

–JEFF MILES


To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department:
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Copyright The Gazette 1999