Volume 93, Issue 95

Wednesday, March 29, 2000


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Shithead keeps talking Trash

Horn sees world in comic light

Can we see some ID?

Days, Daisies all worthy efforts

Days, Daisies all worthy efforts




Eels
Daisies Of The Galaxy
DreamWorks

The last time we heard from Eels' brainchild Mark Everett, (better known as E), it was on the incredibly poignant and underrated Electro-Shock Blues, a touching and heartfelt rumination on death and the afterlife.

Daisies Of The Galaxy catches E at a decidedly happier time in his life. It's obvious from the festive horn intro that kicks off album opener "Grace Kelly Blues," that E is in a much better place.

Although there are certainly a few tear-jerkers here, this is an album that is positively brimming with joyous sentiment.

Almost every track is accentuated by E's simple arrangements and uncanny pop songwriting ability. With an almost anthemic refrain of "goddamn right/it's a beautiful day," album closer and lead single "Mr. E's Beautiful Blues" is poised to become the pop hit of the summer and serves as a fitting end to a uplifting and gutsy record.

–Mark Pytlik


Blue Rodeo
the days in between
Warner Music

Amidst a number of older artists trying to win the hearts of young listeners with poppy contrivances, it's nice to see a band with as much integrity as longevity. And if anyone practices stylistic loyalty, it's Blue Rodeo.

If you're already a fan, you won't be disappointed with this assortment of typical Blue Rodeo offerings. While not groundbreaking, the days in between provides a solid showcase for what the group does well – candied melodies, Canadian personality and all.

Opening track "Cinema Song" sets a mellow tone which continues throughout the album. These sleepy songs make the effort a perfect candidate for a dulcet summer collection – the lulling "Sad Nights" will undoubtedly be one of the most popular for exactly this.

Because the album rolls so pacificly, however, the harder songs tend to sound abrasive. With particularly grating, generic electric riffs is "begging you to let me in."

Despite some rough spots, overall the days in between is a palatable listen highlighting the band's strengths while avoiding a stale sound.

As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

–Sara Martel




To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department:
gazette.entertainment@julian.uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 2000