Volume 94, Issue 97

Friday, March 23, 2001


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

The curtain rises on God

Darude conjures up a storm

UWO greets CBC documentaries

Listen to history

Mudhoney album a mess

The twisted tale of Julia and Oscar

Darude conjures up a storm


Gazette File Photo
IS IT HOT IN HERE OR IS IT JUST ME? With eyes like that, will anybody even notice DJ Darude is spinning tonight at DV8? (Sigh)


By Christopher Hodge
Gazette Staff

Here's a hypothetical situation: You've just flown into Canada from Finland. You arrive in Vancouver and feverishly dash from one beautiful scenic coast to the other, soaking in everything along the way. When it's all said and done, what's the first thing that pops into your head when you reflect on your continent-spanning road trip?

"West Edmonton Mall," says DJ Darude, as he describes his recent tour, fondly recalling the mall's waterpark and its many attractions, including a huge waterslide. "It was wild – it went straight down."

Darude's fascination with anything fast and furious, is consistent with the sound he generates in his live performances. Renowned as one of Finland's best dance DJs, Darude has had huge success with his first single "Sandstorm," which sold over 400,000 copies in Europe and reached number three on the UK singles chart.

Now, having built a reputation overseas, Darude is bringing his sugar-fuelled sound to North America, starting with Canada. "I like the way you guys – how can I say it? – say what's on your mind," Darude stated, describing the rave audiences on this side of the Atlantic Ocean.

Having frequented discos since he was 12, Darude knows when an audience is responding to his music, since his keen eye is always on them during his shows. "They start throwing their hands up in the air, or jumping up and down."

He also notes how infectious dance music can be in a crowded room. "If somebody starts doing it, then everybody goes along with it." He adds, "You just see people dancing, enjoying the music and grooving. That's one of my main purposes – to make them dance."

His formula for a successful rave is simple: "A bigger crowd equals bigger noise," he said. Although he's played everything from discreet underground raves, to outdoor festivals, he doesn't discount the strength of a smaller venue compared to a larger atmosphere. "Both are good," he said. "But when you play a smaller club with 200 people, it's much more intimate – it's a different feeling."

Darude, who works primarily with synthesizers, is part of a new generation of musicians who create their own music from the convenience of their living rooms with the use of modern computers.

"In my studio, I have a Pentium II with 350 MHz," he revealed, excitedly describing the toys that have allowed him to create his unique sound. "Unfortunately, it's ancient history already."

Having shipped his sound all the way from Finland, Darude has been quite impressed with the response he has seen on Canadian shores. Along with a host of other DJs, he recently played in Toronto at The Docks nightclub, and says he was pleasantly surprised by the attendance. "I think the turn-out was over 2,000," he says. "It was really good for a Monday."

Darude says he's looking forward to the release of his first CD, Before The Storm, which lands on this continent on Mar. 27. While his stay here will be short, it seems certain when he returns to Finland, he will have only good things to say about the Canadian rave scene and the waterslides at the West Edmonton Mall.



Darude is spinning at DV8 tonight at 9 p.m..


To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department:
gazette.entertainment@julian.uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 2000