Volume 95, Issue 34

Thursday, November 1, 2001
 
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OPINIONS

Using terrorist tactics to fight terrorism in Afghanistan

1700's man hates treadmills

Using terrorist tactics to fight terrorism in Afghanistan

To the Editor:

On Sept. 11, the world witnessed one of the most vicious acts of terrorism.

The perpetrators of these attacks apparently felt dealing a blow to some of America's most esteemed symbols would disrupt the entire nation and force the American government to re-evaluate its foreign policy.

The terrorists knew very well that thousands of innocent lives would be lost. However, we can only presume they believed this to be the inevitable price for the success of their objectives.

Now, let's analyze the response. A few weeks ago, the United States began a bombing campaign on Afghanistan. The goal: to capture bin Laden and put an end to his network.

The U.S. army began by bombing the virtually non-existent infrastructure of Afghanistan. They felt that by dealing a blow to what little remained of Afghanistan's infrastructure, the Taliban would be forced to surrender bin Laden or surrender their power.

Like the terrorists of Sept. 11, the American government knew very well that thousands of innocent lives would be lost through direct bombing and starvation.

Like the terrorists, they also seem to believe this price was inevitable in order to ensure the success of their objectives.

Like the terrorists, if the American government is asked 'why kill the innocent?,' they will probably answer 'in retaliation for the thousands killed by evil terrorists.'

Conclusion: Terrorism is terrorism, whether carried out by radical groups or state-sponsored. America's war will only increase terrorism and create a vicious cycle of violence.

To what end?

Nabil Sultan

Medicine II


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Copyright The Gazette 2001