Volume 95, Issue 51

Friday, November 30, 2001
 
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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Bullfrog hops back into London swamp

Porn o' Plenty

Monopoly masters lunch game

Band doesn't mind the provincial gap

Heavy metal that's... poetic?

Heavy metal that's... poetic?

By Molly Duignan
Gazette Staff


When someone says "heavy metal," one usually imagines angst-driven, political lyrics from a band with an equally dark image. One does not generally associate "heavy metal" with "poetry."

Byron Rexworthy, frontman for London's, The Khedive, says poetic metal is possible. "One thing we try and get past is the typical metal stereotype of swearing in all the lyrics and all-out aggression. Our music is intense, but the lyrics are fairly emotional. They're more poetic-driven," he says.

Back together after a long hiatus, The Khedive play their second show tonight at Call the Office. Among other heavy London bands, The Khedive believe they are different.

Rexworthy calls it "Swedish metal" and describes their music as energetic and technical.

"With the style we play, we'll never be mainstream. We just want to get our name out there and get signed by a heavy label. There's lots of other good heavy bands in London, but no one who plays the exact same genre as us. We draw a pretty diverse crowd," he explains.

Perhaps because they're young – all members except Rexworthy are still in high school – or perhaps because they don't look like a "typical" metal band, The Khedive are not yet jaded by the local music scene. They just want to be heard.

"I think [London's] scene is fairly supportive, [it's] definitely improving. There's a lot of younger bands starting up. Basically, we just want to get some recognition [and] play," he explains.

"We're all just skinny guys, pretty normal looking. If we were at a show, you wouldn't look at us and think we're into metal. I don't think we fit the stereotype," Rexworthy says.

A music industry arts student at Fanshawe College, Rexworthy became involved in the metal scene because it appealed to his political interests. "I got into the whole hardcore scene because I used to be pretty big into animal rights and activism. At the time, it seemed to go hand-in-hand," he says.

Three of Khedive's five members are vegetarians, but their personal politics don't overwhelm their sound. "We're not political at all, but we used to be," Rexworthy says.

"That's not really the direction we're going. I don't like singing about views I might have, it's just really not our style."

So then what exactly are The Khedive?

"I would describe [our music] as melodic, intense, heavier. It's really aggressive – but pretty," he explains.

"[Our sound] is not along the same lines of Korn or Slipknot. It's a style that's just starting to become popular."



The Khedive play Call the Office tonight with four other bands. The cost is $5 at the door, of which a portion will go to the London Food Bank.




To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department:
gazette.entertainment@uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 2001