Volume 95, Issue 20

Thursday, October 4, 2001
 
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NEWS

Debate rages over Code

Gazette Investigation - The "Movie Night" saga

The Code: know it, love it, obey it

Restaurant rides The Wave of success

Date rape a growing concern

News Briefs

The Code: know it, love it, obey it

Want to know what you can't do as a Western student?

Have a read of our condensed "for dummies" version of the Code of Student Conduct – required bedtime reading for students looking to avoid serious trouble at Western.



What is this thing, anyway?

In a nutshell, the Code defines an expected standard of student behaviour. It gives examples of what you can't do and where you can't do it, as well as examples of punishments and the appeals process.



What can't I do?

Basically, anything that might be seen to have an adverse effect on the reputation, health, safety, rights or property of Western, its community members or visitors.

The lengthy list includes disrupting Western activities; misconduct including assault, harassment, or coercing a person to commit a demeaning act; misconduct involving property; use of false identification; use of illegal drugs; breaking of provincial liquor laws; violation of university regulations; contravention of any other provincial or federal law.



Where can't I do it?

To avoid getting charged under the Code, avoid doing anything bad on the Western campus or at its affiliated colleges. The bad stuff you do off-campus also falls under the Code if you are perceived to be acting as a representative of Western in any capacity, including as a member of a club or council.

Students registered at affiliated colleges are expected to follow the Code while on Western property, however, the application of the Code is subject to the discretion of the college principal when on affiliated college property.



What will happen to me?

Some of the following sanctions may be imposed on you: verbal warning; exclusion from a class, examination room, or other area; formal reprimand; removal from a course; restricting your access to any academic facility, part, or entirety of Western premises; restricting your employment capacity at Western; compensation for loss, damage or injury; forfeiture of awards or financial assistance; disciplinary probation; deregistration; suspension; expulsion.



What can I do if I get in trouble?

If faced with one of the more serious punishments, you can appeal the sanction to the University Discipline Appeals Committee.


To Contact The News Department:
gazette.news@uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 2001