Volume 95, Issue 10

Tuesday, September 18, 2001
 
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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

The new Plan calls for an ass kickin' good time

The Glass House shatters

Keanu gets it right in the 'hood

Hissy Fit: adding a little spunk to punk

Don't be silenced by tragedy

Tielli solo is a no-go

This is for sure, tweaker rocks

Hissy Fit: adding a little spunk to punk

By Stephen Pizzale
Gazette Writer


Since the emergence of bands like Blink 182 and Sum 41, punk has never been quite the same.

The music lost touch with its roots. Thankfully, Hissy Fit – with a noticeable lack of numeric digits in their name – is reminding people what good old-fashioned punk rock should sound like.

For the past couple of years, Hissy Fit has been quietly honing their craft with a conscious effort to stay true to the music they grew up with and avoid being influenced by mainstream music.

"I think we are more rock, only because today's definition of punk doesn't really suit me anymore. I think it's more 'polka punk' at this point, and it's giving punk a bad name," says lead singer Gisele Grignet.

While trying to avoid the associations with today's punk scene, Hissy Fit also try to distance themselves from other female-fronted bands. Constantly being compared to the likes of Joan Jett, Courtney Love and Deborah Harry, the band is seeking an image all their own.

As Grignet explains, "the Courtney reference really bugged me because for a long time, that was the only one. It doesn't bother me quite so much anymore, but the first four years we were a band, it wouldn't go away and it was the only comparison. I thought that was just a little easy."

Writing comes easily to this group and after having hammered out their record in only three months, the songs are clearly cathartic for Grignet. "My music is my therapy. For me, I'm always getting something off my chest and if it helps somebody else well, great," she says.

Grignet has no problem finding inspiration. Anything and everything adds fuel to her lyrical fire and although she loves writing her own songs, she's not opposed to playing covers.

Gazette File Photo
"HEY MAN -- CHICKS SWEAT, TOO." Gisele Grignet leads Hissy Fit tonight at Call the Office. Layaway Plan are also on the bill.

"Whenever we do a cover, we try to make it our own song and we don't do that with disrespect obviously, but to do a cover of somebody else's stuff and try to do it the way they did it is destined to fail. You gotta put your own spin on it or there's no point," Grignet says, referring to Hissy Fit's cover of Chrissie Hynde's tune "Precious" on their latest album.

Despite all this talk about albums, the band lives for playing live. This is evident in Restless which was recorded live off the floor in a mere two days. The band's entire set seems to burst with a type of energy common only in live music.

Grignet agrees it's necessary to try to achieve live sound on a CD, as it's often missing in much of today's music.

"It's a complete release for me, absolutely. It's the one and only time that I can just freak out and nobody's gonna' tell me I'm over-reacting," Grignet says.

Although musically satisfied, Hissy Fit are constantly trying to be recognized for their musical abilities and not the fact they have a female vocalist or an independent record deal.

"People completely write us off before they hear us because, I think, boy du jour is the scene of the year," Grignet decides. "I think we get written off more because we're independent rather than because we're female fronted."

Living up to the energy she shows on her CD, Grignet responds to the final question of the day: Why should people go to a Hissy Fit concert?

"Because we're a fucking good band."



Hissy Fit opens for Layaway Plan at Call the Office tonight. Doors open at 9 p.m. and tickets are $5 at the door.






To Contact The Arts and Entertainment Department:
gazette.entertainment@uwo.ca

Copyright The Gazette 2001