Volume 95, Issue 83

Tuesday, March 12, 2002
 
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NEWS

VP forum allows for schmooze-fest

Raging storm flattens Forest City

Cabbies endangered: drivers beaten and robbed

Negotiations begin in Dalhousie strike

Sex without consequences anyone?

Hockey and opera worth puck all

Negotiations begin in Dalhousie strike

By Jessica Leeder
Gazette Staff


The end of Dalhousie University's faculty strike could be in sight as both sides returned to the bargaining table in Halifax yesterday.

The Dalhousie Faculty Association bargaining unit began to negotiate the terms of a new contract with the university at 1 p.m. yesterday.

The strike, which began last Monday when the DFA rejected a non-negotiable proposal originally submitted by the administration on Feb. 22, effects 14,000 students at the Halifax university.

Seven hundred and seventy-two professors, librarians and counsellors went on strike to press for increased salaries, guaranteed staffing levels and a number of other contract benefits.

In a press release issued yesterday, Dalhousie confirmed its responsibility to match faculty hiring to the evolving needs of students.

"Dalhousie must retain its ability to place faculty resources where they are most needed, as student enrollment continues to change and grow," read the statement.

"Dalhousie is willing to negotiate on issues that have been put forward during the collective bargaining process, but the university cannot surrender its flexibility to place faculty resources where students need them most."

"They're on the record in saying they understand that compromise is necessary," said DFA President Andrew Wainwright, adding the DFA is fully prepared to compromise with the university.

Adele Poirier, spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia Ministry of Education, said despite the fact that 40 per cent of Dalhousie's funding comes from the government, it will not intervene if today's talks are unsuccessful.

"There are labour laws in place for employees and employers to work things out for themselves – that's how the process works," she said, adding she is pleased to see the DFA took the initiative to resume talks.

A spokesperson for Dalhousie could not be reached for comment.


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Copyright The Gazette 2002