Volume 96, Issue 8
Wednesday, September 11, 2002

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Canadians complacent to potential attack

By Chris Webden
Gazette Staff

One year after the most horrendous attack in recent North American history, many Canadians still have terrorism on their minds.

In a recent poll conducted by Sun Media/Leger Marketing, 11 per cent of Canadians polled are very confident the federal government could handle a terrorist attack. Thirty-nine per cent are somewhat confident in our government's response capabilities, while 32 per cent are not very confident.

The final 14 per cent of those polled are not at all confident that the Canadian government could handle a terrorist attack like the one that happened in the United States last year.

Around campus, fear of an attack on Canadian soil seemed a distant concern.

"We won't be attacked because we do our best not to step on any body's feet," said Mike Gaze, a fourth-year kinesiology student.

According to Jim Cameron, a third-year French student, Canada is too multicultural to warrant a terrorist attack, adding more damage can be done in the US.

"There is no chance in hell they will attack Canada," Cameron stated.

"Nothing is going to happen tomorrow," said Meaghan Beatty, a third-year French student. "The terrorists like to do things when nobody expects it. Everybody is expecting something tomorrow," she added.

"Of course we can handle an attack," Cameron said. "If the States can do it, why can't we?"

The poll also asked Canadians whether they thought the relationship between Canada and the United States had improved, stayed the same or worsened since Sept. 11.

Only 17 per cent of people polled felt the relationship between our two countries had worsened, despite President Bush's snubbing of Canada while thanking America's friends and allies. Twenty-seven per cent felt the relationship had improved and 53 per cent replied that it had stayed the same.

Beatty said Canada's relationship with the United States had definitely improved.

"[Canada] supported the States 100 per cent and I think that definitely helped," she explained.

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2002 THE GAZETTE