Volume 96, Issue 60
Thursday, January 16, 2003

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News Briefs

Crazy get rich quick schemes

The Richard Ivey School of Business is offering information sessions on their honours business administration program.

Two sessions will be held – one today and one on Tuesday, Feb. 11. Both sessions will be held in the J.E. Brent Auditorium, Rm. 1R40 in the Ivey building at 2 p.m., said Larysa Gamula, director of the HBA office at Ivey.

Western students are invited to listen to presentations by Gamula and a current HBA student, and will have the opportunity to ask questions of class managers, she added.

The one-hour session will specifically focus on how to apply to the HBA program and will include a general run-through of the application, due to an upcoming deadline of Mar. 3, Gamula said. The presentations will also touch on the HBA program structure, concurrent programs, exchange opportunities, admission requirements and student life, she said.

Program office staff will also be available after the session to answer any questions students may have, she said.

–Deanne Miachika



125 candles? We need a big cake


Ideas are currently being collected for Western's 125th anniversary celebrations.

"We're looking for any sort of ideas or proposals," said Robert Wood, dean of the Don Wright faculty of music and co-chair of the anniversary planning committee.

"[These ideas can come from] on campus or from the community at large," Wood said. "We're trying to get as many people involved as possible."

"Some examples of different kinds of proposals include musical performances, lectures and cultural performances," Wood said, noting the committee is trying to keep the doors as open as possible.

Western's anniversary celebrations are being looked after by a central committee, which has a very wide range of representatives. According to Wood, faculty, staff, students, alumni and Londoners are taking part in the planning committee.

"There are a number of events planned already, including a launch event, [which will be] finalized shortly," Wood said, adding there will be some events attached to Homecoming in the fall.

"The deadline for idea proposals is Jan. 31," Wood said. "The committee will be making decisions mid-February."

To submit ideas, go to Western's Web site at www.uwo.ca and click on the 125th anniversary link.

–Rachel Sandieson



But will painting cure a hangover?


Art therapists and graduate students from the Western art therapy program will be displaying their works this month in an exhibition entitled Envisioning Scapes and Spaces.

"Art therapy involves using art as a therapeutic tool to bridge the verbal and the non-verbal," said event organizer Lydia Clapton.

Clients draw pictures and use them as a jumping-off point for discussion, a technique that has worked well with children, war veterans and people suffering from brain injuries, she explained.

Clapton said she believes it is important for the therapists themselves to have a foundation in art.

Although art therapy is not a new field, Clapton said the organizers hope that the fourth annual exhibition will continue to raise public awareness and build bridges with the community.

Envisioning Scapes and Spaces runs until Jan. 21 at the Arts Project, located at 203 Dundas St.. The gallery is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon until 5 p.m..

–Diana Whellams



A glimpse of the real world


Running out of money and looking for a job? The Student Development Centre is here to help.

The SDC will be holding an All-Campus Job Fair in the gymnasiums and main level of the University Community Centre on Jan. 28 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., said Sharon Lee, recruitment co-ordinator for the SDC's Career Service program.

The Job Fair will provide students with the opportunity to approach companies from a variety of different fields, including banking, engineering and nursing, Lee said, adding there will also be booths set up with information about summer opportunities. There are currently 75 different organizers participating, she added.

"I think it's always a good thing when we have organizations travel to campus and set up booths, and are willing to talk to students about job opportunities," she said.

–Christopher Hodge

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