Volume 96, Issue 62
Tuesday January 21, 2003
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TODAY'S COMIC


LAST UPDATED: Tuesday January 21, 2003 - 12:30 p.m.

Faculty give union power to strike

Western's faculty has voted to give its union the power to strike if negotiations with the university administration reach an impasse.

Seventy per cent of faculty members who went to the polls last Thursday and Friday, favoured giving the union the mandate to strike. "We're very pleased with the result," said University of Western Ontario Faculty Association President Paul Handford.



London joins international protest against war on Iraq

Community and religious leaders gathered at a rally on Saturday in downtown London to protest Canada's position on future military action in Iraq.

Approximately 500 people, many waving signs with anti-military slogans, attended the rally, which was held in front of the John Labatt Centre.



Science falls on deaf Western ears

Bunsen Burners can create intense heat, but unfortunately they can't lay the heat on Western administration.

The Let's Talk Science Partnership Program, a campus organization since 1991, will be unable to continue operating for this semester, and the next academic year, due to the program's inability to secure funding from the university's central office or the individual departments of the faculty of science.



Liberal tuition scheme critiqued

The upcoming release of the Ontario Liberal Party education platform will enable parents to pre-pay their children's tuition at current rates – a move that will benefit wealthier families with disposable income, critics say.

Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty first announced the plan back in March 2002 at the annual Heritage dinner, but the issue attracted renewed attention when McGuinty spoke at Western last Thursday.



MORE NEWS HEADLINES:
> THE USUAL SUSPECTS: Tracking peepers across the snow
> 2002/03 USC Report Card
> LHSC finishes at head of the class
> Banging may be good for the brain
Porn stars may be geniuses

> News Briefs


Paolo Zinatelli/Gazette
A PLEA FOR PEACE. Jack Layton, a candidate for the leadership of the federal NDP party was in London to speak at the peace protest held on Saturday outside the John Labatt Centre. About 500 people were on hand to hear Layton and others speak.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

If you're interested in seeing a romantic, quirky comedy that varies from the likes of Maid in Manhattan – mostly due to the presence of intriguing actors – director Chris Koch's A Guy Thing provides a familiar love story with a twist.


MORE A&E HEADLINES:

> THEATRE REVIEW: Yeomen of the Guard
> CD REVIEWS: Nas, Common
> CD REVIEW: Whaling
> Escape is truly at hand for this Travelling Man
> Showcasing the alternatives

SPORTS

Boyce shuts down Windsor
Talbot caps off five point weekend

Sweet 16.

That's how old you have to be get your driver's license in Ontario, the drinking age in Great Britain, the average age of R. Kelly's girlfriends and it just happens to be the number of consecutive regular season games won by the Western Mustangs men's hockey team.


MORE SPORTS HEADLINES:

> Is it Clark Kent or Peter Sidler?
> V-ball victory
> Volleyball's libero - can you dig it?
> Drinking jockeys and Saddam's son
> Hockey Pool Results as of January 21st, 2003

CAMPUS & CULTURE

Illicit drugs: the highs and lows

This week’s C&C feature examines the controversial, and sometimes deadly, world of illegal drugs. Through research, expert opinion and interviews with former users, The Gazette has compiled a profile on the nature, side-effects and inherent physical and mental dangers of common illicit drugs in today’s society


© 2002 THE GAZETTE