Volume 96, Issue 64
Thursday, January 23, 2003

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MIT: skills for a New World Order

Re: "MIT not where it hoped to be," Jan. 21

To the Editor:

OK. It's true. The media, information and technoculture course does not provide "hands-on" skills for media production (except, as mentioned, the couple of courses on HTML and multimedia packages).

What it does, however, is produce something unique within students that sets it apart from any other faculty: profound cynicism.

Sure, go ahead! Get lumped with the masses in kinesiology, biology or philosophy to study other great "hands-on" skills. What relevance does media have in our society anyway? It's not as though it's around every corner, constantly in your line of sight, trying to persuade you and "inform" you.

As a hopeful media lawyer-to-be (I can hear you groaning, by the way), I know that my education in the MIT faculty has provided me with probably the most important skill to possess in the New World Order of e-mails, Web sites and corporate infiltration of public space: critical thought.

So, Mr. Macfarlane, I urge you to enjoy your world of 10-second sound-bites and sports highlights. And, by the way, what exactly would constitute a program that would help you in your quest to become a lawyer, journalist or public relations officer? The "how to hold a camera and use Adobe Premiere" at Fanshawe College? I think not.

Brad Newman
MIT Honors III

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