Volume 96, Issue 64
Thursday, January 23, 2003

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Gazette understates the evils of drugs, suffers from stale air

Re: "The world of illicit drugs," Jan. 16

To the Editor:

Can someone please explain to me what that was? Was it written to inform the readers? Was it written to get a rise from the readers? If it was for the latter, then you certainly got one out of me.

The main article titled "Illicit drugs: the highs and lows" gives us the 411 on ecstasy, mushrooms, cocaine, crystal meth and LSD, and under each of these, it explains what it is, how to use it, what the physical effects are and how it feels.

Please, enlighten those fresh fish who are still curious about drugs. "Dad, can you put another $500 into my account so I can shoot up for a few weeks?"

I have a couple of friends who think along the lines of, "OSAP! Sweet! Where's the bar?" I think it would be fair to say that I can project this thought process onto the aforementioned. I mean, it's all for fun, right? "Good times had by all (or sometimes, had by one)," right?

The second article titled "In case you say 'yes'" is even worse. Talk about getting an education, eh? There's a disclaimer at the top of this article saying how The Gazette in no way endorses the use of illegal drugs. It closes off by stating the article "is intended to explain the potential harmful side-effects of drug use, as well as provide some perspective for those who choose to ignore these potential dangers."

Nowhere in this article is there anything mentioned about harmful side-effects, or about consequences and repercussions. This disclaimer would probably apply better in the previous article, but even in the newspaper version, where did this disclaimer appear? It was in a small box in the top right-hand corner under the title in case you say "yes". You even give me the proper lingo to use with the dealers. Sweet!

Finally, in a weak attempt to make good, there's an article titled "The new heroin, but not really," about methadone and a health clinic in Toronto called The Works. [It would have been] all good except this article borders along the lines of saying how methadone can be a good substitute for heroin.

Has The Gazette gone mad? Did the stale air in the UCC finally reach the office? Please tell me what you were thinking when you published this.

Michael Wong
Psychology III

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