Volume 96, Issue 67
Wednesday, January 29, 2003

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Can you burn your values?

Re: "The burning question: to burn or not to burn?" Jan. 15

To the Editor:

I would like to give my wholehearted support to Ms. Wrobel for her position on CD burning. The morally corrupted music lovers of North America have been burning too many CDs without regard for the hard working bands that produce them. Pirating music (as well as movies and computer software) is just a cheap and lazy way out of working legitimately for the goods that you desire.

The standard argument against the pirating community is that they deprive starving artists of their rightful share. However, less than 25 per cent of the money you spend when you purchase a CD gets to the artists themselves, with the rest going to retail distributors like HMV. Most artists make more money from touring and from selling their merchandise on their tours than from album sales.

The real issue here is the absence of the values of work, saving and earning the goods that we buy. It's a poor excuse to say you can't afford to purchase the "overpriced" retail CDs if you went to the bar last night and blew $25 on cab, cover and drinks. These self-proclaimed "too poor to afford retail prices" are really just trying to get both sides of what is supposed to be a consumer's budgeting trade-off.

I find the purchase of a good CD provides much more long-term benefits than one bar night anyway. In the pro-burning half of the article, Mr. Wyatt implies that if I have ever made a mix tape or copied a rental video, I can't look down upon CD burning. Unfortunately, Mr. Wyatt, two wrongs don't make a right and this statement is a fitting example of the moral bankruptcy epidemic.

Jeff Zon
ACS II

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