Volume 96, Issue 87
Friday, March 14, 2003

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Listen to Canada at the UN

Re: "Threats won't go," Mar.6

To the Editor:

This is a response to a letter written by Jeff Armour. The purpose of his letter was to basically question the morals of those who do not support the possible war with Iraq. To me, and many others, as shown by the countless protests and demonstrations all over the world, a war with Iraq is illogical, immoral and unnecessary.

President Bush has his own agenda and is quite obviously not concerned with the opinions of everyone else in the world, including the United Nations. Whether it is to clean up his father's mess, avenge 9/11, test weapons or for economic reasons, Bush is going to war regardless of the opinions of others. In his letter, Armour asks, "In a year from now, when a biological weapon goes off on a TTC bus in Toronto, who is to blame?" His answer is the antiwar public, for trying to convince the world not to go to war.

I think the more important question to ask is who is to blame if terrorists that support Saddam attack the United States and its allies from within the country while the military is storming Iraq? Or who is to blame for the thousands, possibly millions, of civilians that could perish if Baghdad is carpet-bombed? Don't get me and those who are against the war wrong – to be antiwar is not to be pro-terrorism or pro-Saddam. We believe in a healthy solution, such as Canadian ambassador to the United Nations Paul Heinbecker's call for more inspections and the demilitarization of Iraq.

To go to war with Iraq is a quick fix, but not a permanent solution. The U.S. and the UN should be looking to stop the sanctions in Iraq and help the country become peaceful and safe again, not going to war.

Adam Pesce
Social Science I

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