gazette alumni society
Volume 96, Issue 88
Tuesday March 18, 2003
Green with envy
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GAZETTE ALUMNI SOCIETY

TODAY'S COMIC


LAST UPDATED: Tuesday March 18, 2003 - 12:10 p.m.

The death of diplomacy: war looms

The United States is officially on the brink of war and the clock is ticking, after President George W. Bush sent Iraq a 48-hour ultimatum in a nationally televised address last night.

"For more than a decade, the United States and other nations have pursued patient and honourable efforts to disarm the [Iraqi] regime," Bush said



Anti-war efforts continue

With the seeming inevitability of an American-led war in the Middle East, antiwar advocates in London and across the nation are stepping up their efforts to make their voices heard.

"I think today we're feeling deeply troubled and sad at what looks like imminent war," said Rebecca Coulter, a professor in Western's faculty of education and organizer of Saturday's war protest in London's Victoria Park, which saw between 3,000 and 3,500 protesters.



Yeoman gets friends

Two landslide victories and two nail-biting races marked the end results of this year's University Students' Council vice-presidential elections, as four new students prepare to take on their positions on next year's Board of Directors.

According to incoming VP-campus issues and fourth-year kinesiology student Adrienne Kennedy, the campaign was an incredibly emotional experience.

 


Western pulls in research chairs

Three more Canada Research Chairs were awarded yesterday to professors at Western, bringing the university's total to 30.

Research chairs allow professors to advance their careers among world-class colleagues, hire top graduate students and state-of-the-art research facilities, confirmed Natalie Beaudoin, communications officer at CRC.

MORE NEWS HEADLINES:
> Local hooligans enjoy stupidity
> UCC immersed in culture
> Freedom of speech in peril?

Congratulations to the new regime!

A bunch of journalists turned politico this past Friday, as The Gazette held its front office elections to determine the editor-in-chief, deputy editor and managing editor for Volume 97 of the paper. Emmett Macfarlane used right wing rhetoric to land himself the position of editor-in-chief, promising to steal money from the poor to buy new computers and a cigarette machine for the office. The new deputy editor, Paolo Zinatelli, ran a shrewd campaign, buying off votes by offering slices of his mom’s famous lasagna to staff members. Finally, retired basketball great Jordan Bell earned himself the role of managing editor after he demonstrated enough leadership skills to lead even the L.A. Clippers to a winning season. The current/lame duck front office would like to express their condolences... err congratulations to the new team. Good luck lads, we believe in ya.


Stephen Harding
PREVIEW OF COMING ATROCITIES. Protesters gathered in London and around the world on Saturday for what is becoming an increasingly vain attempt to convince the United States not to declare war on Iraq.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

London movie fans filled the theatre at Rainbow Cinemas for opening night of the ninth annual UWO Film Festival on Friday. If the enthusiastic round of applause given to the young filmmakers at the end of the screening was any indication, no one in the audience left disappointed.


MORE A&E HEADLINES:

> Indie bands get a New Rotation
> MOVIE REVIEW: Willard
> MOVIE REVIEW: Agent Cody Banks

SPORTS

Krynen vaults to silver

On the heels of a stunning win at the Ontario University Athletics Championships two weeks ago, Western entered the St. Denis Centre in Windsor as, not only Ontario champs, but the defending CIS champions, so you might think their sixth place finish at the meet was a disappointment – it wasn't.


MORE SPORTS HEADLINES:

> Heffernan gains redemption

CAMPUS & CULTURE

Out of bathroom stalls and into public debate

October 10, 539 BC: Celebration continues late into the night in the city of Babylon, while enemy forces camp outside. As King Belshazzar entertained followers, a disembodied hand scrawled cryptic writing on the wall; the kingdom was found wanting and Babylon would be taken by the Persians. The writing on the wall revealed the true state – and fate – of the Babylonian empire. Later that night Belshazzar was executed.

MORE C&C HEADLINES:
> On-campus intolerance: a Western tradition?

A new C&C every Thursday!


© 2002 THE GAZETTE