gazette alumni society
Volume 96, Issue 91
Friday March 21, 2003
Maja's art
Search the Archives:

PHOTO GALLERY
COMICS
SUBMIT LETTER
CONTESTS
ADVERTISING
VOLUNTEERS
ABOUT US
ARCHIVES
LINKS

GAZETTE ALUMNI SOCIETY

TODAY'S COMIC

WEEKEND EDITION
LAST UPDATED: Friday March 21, 2003 - 4:10 p.m.

ARTS ISSUE

Troops enter Iraq

United States and British troops punched across the Kuwait-Iraq border yesterday, meeting minimal Iraqi resistance as they rumbled past flaming oil fields on their way north. These skirmishes signalled the spearhead of the immense ground invasion of Iraq had started to knife its way through the desert destined for Baghdad.



Dissecting war coverage

The American-led war on Iraq is at the centre of a media maelstrom, but how should we ingest the overwhelming amount of information?
The Gazette sought some of Western's own expert opinions on what to expect in the war's coverage.
"Propaganda," said Huron University College political science professor Paul Nesbitt-Larking. "It's wartime, and everyone has a vested interest, especially the combatant sides.



NDP critic slams Tory record on education


The provincial Progressive Conservatives were lambasted on their social policy yesterday afternoon in the University Community Centre by the New Democratic Party's critic for the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Rosario Marchese.
Marchese appeared alongside Rebecca Coulter, NDP candidate for London North Centre, courtesy of SmartVote. SmartVote is a University Students' Council initiative which encourages members of provincial parliament to come and speak directly to students at Western, said USC VP-education Joshua Morgan.
.

 


Council restructuring contested
Residence representation key concern

A motion that could alter the entire structure of the University Students' Council has residence councillors in an uproar about losing their voting power.



Imminent faculty strike unlikely?

The possibility of a faculty strike or lockout before the end of the academic term is virtually impossible, as the conciliation process has begun and the next meeting is scheduled for Mar. 28.

 

MORE NEWS HEADLINES:
> NEWS FOR DUMMIES: Dummy news in poetic form


Nicole D'Cruz/Gazette

THE ARTS ISSUE

I’ve noticed some things lately about humanity as a whole, how we’ve all gotten so uninteresting. I’m guessing it wasn’t always like this. But somewhere, sometime, someone put their foot down and said, “everyone pick now, cuz we’re stopping this little revolving door.” so they did, and here we are; everyone is in their little box of who they are. The taxi drivers are taxi drivers, the starvers are still starving, and old withering musicians showing up on “Behind the Music” are still doing, well, that. So I’m supposed to figure out what I am, because that’s the little box I’m supposed to be.

And then there’s money, making trouble like a child with a noisemaker; you can’t really blame it, but you want to do SOMETHING, ANYTHING to shut him up for a little while, so you can finally get some peace and quiet.
I just got sidetracked thinking about groups of friends. How people seem different in every combination. When I was young I wanted to have a group like I saw on TV, the poison that is in place to convince everyone that their lives are substandard and buying little packets of dishwasher detergent or Coke will make them better. I realize now that those little groups are impossible. There’s no one time when everyone likes each other, and there’s no one time when you can tolerate everyone. Just as one person gets on your nerves, you drift toward the others, until you spend too much time with them, so you just float around until you drift to entirely new people altogether and the cycle begins again.

So we seem to be stuck in place, in this little hole, like a pack of cars surrounding a police car that’s the only group actually going the speed limit and there’s nowhere to go cuz anywhere you went you’d run into other people. Of course, I don’t want to come off like a hermit or anything. I’m not that antisocial. Just very selective. I don’t think I do it too much, as much as some do it too little. Way too many people should be outcast from society for just being blithering idiots. There are those, that take up room in now dance used-to-be-real-music clubs, and show up at school once a week, and think they have a future, and are so rotted with narcotics and alcohol they actually think it brilliant to write their name in piss on the wall. These are the ones that make me vote for capital punishment. But that would just get corrupt like everything else, I’m sure.

So what’s the proper course of action? First, teach myself to do things only for myself, not anticipating others reading, or hearing, giving me feedback, and “constructive criticism”. Oh, you thought I meant what’s the proper course FOR YOU? Oooooh....well....I’d like to skip cliches, so I won’t say anything, because there seems to be a cliche for everything, none of which are ever followed. Just don’t be afraid to piss on the wall, so we’ll all know in advance who the idiots are. Let’s see them turn that into a fortune cookie.

Adam Fisch

CHECK OUT THE ARTS ISSUE >>

SPORTS

Intramural b-ball showdown
Team with crappiest name wins

The intensity was cranked up on Tuesday night, for a mammoth tilt that saw Da' Dynasty take out So Fresh, So Clean, 88-78, in the Western intramural Super League Men's Basketball Championship on the historic hardwood of Alumni Hall.

MORE SPORTS HEADLINES:
> Choke on this: Vince Carter eats poo
> Straight up: "Vinsanity" alive and well
> 'Da Pipe
> All CIS team

CAMPUS & CULTURE

Hip-Hop commercialization

Let's face it; black is cool.

Elvis knew it, Eminem knows it, and as witnessed by popular cultures warm embrace of hip-hop – you know it too.

MORE C&C HEADLINES:
> Buying and selling the Asian identity


© 2002 THE GAZETTE