March 23, 2004  
Volume 97, Issue 90  

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EDITORIAL

Letters

Stop, thief!

To the Editor:
Thanks to the bastard that decided to steal mine and my friend’s coats from The Ceeps two Fridays ago. It was great standing out in the cold, so I hope you were warm in your two new coats.

If there is a shred of decency in your newly covered body, you can bring the coats back to the scene of the crime, no questions asked.

Adrianne Engleson
Sociology IV

Rock is dead they say...

To the Editor:
I’ve learned that Biology 355b (Adaptations and Ecology of Birds) has been discontinued despite 65 students and a waiting list. Let me guess, they could cancel several small, specialized and well-enrolled courses and create one general level course that devotes two to three lectures to gloss over the in-depth material of the originals and give me yet another ROCK CONCERT LECTURE course.

Western must want to save a bit of money, because in the past decade tuition only increased at 12 times the rate of inflation, much like the minimum wage did, right? At $500 a half-credit, that course brings in $32,500, and tuition is only about half of the cost of education — the rest is government funded.

Why would any student want the focus and attention of being in a more intimate course? We love being one of 700 sardines staring at a small person with a microphone (that is either too quiet or too loud) standing in front of a piece-of-crap video system that NEVER works. I probably won’t want to ask any questions for clarification, not that they would interrupt the Powerpoint laser light show if I did.

Is higher learning about students or money? I’m sick of the rock concert lectures; by third-year, perhaps we could take a few specialized courses that might actually dig a little deeper — but you better hurry because they’re being cancelled.

Write letters to the powers that be and take back control of your university education before they farm it out to Fanshawe College to save money.

Steve O’Reilly
Bio. Enviro III

... long live (indie) rock!

Re: “Radio daze,” Mar. 18, 2004

To the Editor:
It is apparent CHRW 94.9 FM fans are uninformed about the station they wish to defend. Being on the Ivey Client Field Project Team commissioned to review CHRW’s operations, I was dismayed at many of the inaccurate facts.

First, why would one assume that making the station more relevant to students translates to broadcasting “corporate garbage?” CHRW is a campus and community station regulated by the CRTC. It is therefore restricted to airing alternative programs.

Second, CHRW is a not-for-profit organization, so the fact there is no profit was not our group’s concern nor focus. What a concept that a group from Ivey — where capitalism is reputed to prevail — would choose to devote their time to an organization that prides itself on “providing a cure for corporate radio.”

The group’s findings will not be presented until Friday, Mar. 26. Accordingly, the University Students’ Council’s recommendation to increase the station’s relevancy to students is a decision completely unrelated to the group’s report. Members of the group have been avid listeners of CHRW since their first year of university, which motivated the group to undertake the project. Furthermore, the reason we have been contacted is to provide an objective view.

In closing, I request anyone wishing to attack Ivey to produce an educated argument, not one influenced by stereotype.

Pamela Draper
HBA IV

Terrorism never rests

Re: “The War on Terror is futile,” Mar. 18, 2004

To the Editor:
“The War on Terror is futile?” Not completely.

This whole War on Terror issue has been running through my mind for a long time, and Marshall Bellamy’s article brought back some of these thoughts. Terrorists definitely have the advantage. They choose the place, time and method of attack. The victim is clueless. The costs of projecting a sense of an “impenetrable fortress” are astronomical, as seen by the United States’ “homeland security.”

Terrorists can literally wait for the U.S. to bankrupt itself. Just throw in a few attacks elsewhere in the world, and keep the U.S. paranoid and spending. There is no way of staying up in arms 24/7. What happens when your attention falters?

However, the war against terrorism is NOT completely futile. One cannot sit back and be trampled. I still believe George W. Bush’s actions with his “War on Terrorism” are correct, in the sense that it is necessary to put forth some form of “defense” — the best defense is a good offense — to show the U.S. is not a sitting duck. When someone punches you, you punch back and make him or her think twice. Otherwise, they know they can hurt you without repercussions.

Some questions that arise from this are: How far is enough? How do we know we have won? What are we doing that causes these attacks? How can we change? It is important not to falter. However, in the end, the monetary and physical costs must be considered. What is the point of repeatedly attacking a threat that absorbs your punches?

Terror will NEVER be defeated. The virulence and intensity of terrorism can be reduced through social change, rather than the futile hornet extermination efforts by the U.S. and its allies.

Jon Leung
Political Science II

 

 

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